Month: January 2019

How Weird Is Andrew Yang’s Tech Policy? Only About As Weird As America’s.

Presidential hopeful Andrew Yang is famous for his plan to implement a universal basic income to help Americans who lose their jobs to robots. And that isn’t the only place tech innovation takes center stage in his platform. He also advocates that your online data be treated as personal property that you can choose (or not) to sell to companies like Facebook. In a Yang presidency, election results would be verified through blockchain (an encryption system best known for shoring up cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin), quantum computing research would be better funded, and a Legion of Builders and Destroyers would have the power to overrule local zoning and land-use decisions for the greater infrastructure good. He is definitely the only presidential candidate talking seriously about fighting climate change with giant space mirrors.

The World Isn’t Ready For Climate Refugees

You can batten the hatches against a storm, but bureaucracy is harder to ride out. Last week, one of the strongest Atlantic hurricanes on record made a direct hit on the northern Bahamas and stalled there, destroying nearly half the homes on Great Abaco and Grand Bahamas islands. Days later, with their homes in ruins and food and water scarce, hundreds of fleeing Bahamians were asked to leave a ferry bound for Fort Lauderdale, Fla., because they didn’t have a U.S. visa — despite visas not being required in the past. And while U.S. Customs and Border Protection officials blamed the ferry operator, the federal government announced Wednesday it wouldn’t be extending the Dorian survivors temporary protected status.

Is The Supreme Court Heading For A Conservative Revolution?

In the final weeks of the Supreme Court’s last term, the court’s conservative majority overruled two decades-old cases. The cases made headlines — not because their content was especially attention-grabbing, but because of what they may signal for the future. In both cases, liberal justices sounded the alarm on the threats they saw to other precedents. Justice Stephen Breyer even wrote in one dissent that he was left wondering “which cases the Court will overrule next.”

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